The Borough Park Papers Symposium III: How Jewish Should the Messianic Jewish Community Be? Jeffrey A. Adler, Joshua Brumbach, Akiva Cohen, Ph.D., Diane Cohen, Mara Frisch, Steven Charles Ger, Baruch Maoz, Richard C. Nichol, Russ Resnik, Jeffrey L Seif, Oded Shoshani, Chaim Urbach, Tuvya Zaretsky, Th.D.  
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As you read the New Testament, you "overhear" debates first-century Messianic Jews had about critical issues, e.g. Gentiles being "allowed" into the Messianic kingdom (Acts 15). Similarly, you`re now invited to "listen in" as leading twenty-first century Messianic Jewish theologians discuss critical issues facing us today. Some ideas may not fit into your previously held pre-suppositions or pre-conceptions. Indeed, you may find some paradigm shifting in your thinking. We want to share the thoughts of these thinkers with you, our family in the Messiah.

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From Sabbath to Sunday : A Historical Investigation of the Rise of Sunday Observance in Early Christianity Samuele Bacchiocchi  
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From Sabbath to Sunday is a translation and an adaptation of my Italian doctoral dissertation, originally presented at and published by the Pontifical Gregorian University in 1977.

The investigation establishes that the change from Saturday to Sunday began approximately one century after the death of Christ, as a result of an interplay of political, social, pagan and Christian factors. The change in the day of rest and worship was not merely a change of names or of numbers, but rather a change of meaning, authority and experience. Essentially it was a change from a Holy Day into a holiday.

From Sabbath to Sunday has the distinction of being the first book written by a non-Catholic ever to be published by a Pontifical press with the Catholic imprimatur (approval). The book has already been reprinted fourteen times in English and has been translated in several other languages. Hundreds of scholars of different persuasions have praised this book as a definitive treatment of the early history of the Lords Day. I received a gold medal from Pope Paul VI for earning the academic distinction of summa cum laude in my research and school work at the Pontifical Gregorian University, in Rome, Italy.

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Church and Israel After Christendom: The Politics of Election Scott Bader-Saye  
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Two seismic events mark the twentieth century as one of crisis for the Church. The first is the demise of the ideal of Christendom, which held that the Church has been and should be the spiritual sponsor of Western Civilization. The second is the Holocaust, the horrors of which have prompted both the Roman Catholic and Protestant churches to repudiate the teachings and attitudes undergirding their dark history of Jewish persecution. The cumulative effect of these two events is that Christians have been called rethink their own doctrines and practices, especially with regard to the Church’s prior conviction that it had replaced Israel in God’s plan.In his pathbreaking new work, Church and Israel after Christendom, Scott Bader-Saye contends that a renewed understanding of Israel might provide resources to envision a faithful post-Christendom church. Unlike theologians such as John Milbank and Stanley Hauerwas, who have pointed to the Greek polis as a model for renewing ecclesiology, the author suggests that it is not to Aristotle but to Abraham that the Church should look in order to articulate and incarnate a faithful alternative to the voluntarism and violence of modernity. The doctrine of election is the linchpin linking a renewed understanding of Israel with a renewed vision of the post-Christendom church. By recovering a doctrine of election that is both non-supersessionist and fully trinitarian, Christians may recover their political calling to embody a way of life that will bring renewed meaning to the Church and to Christians’ participation in the world.

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The Ways That Never Parted: Jews and Christians in Late Antiquity and the Early Middle Ages Adam H. Becker, Annette Yoshiko Reed  
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In this first paperback edition of a volume originally published by Mohr Siebeck in 2003, stellar international scholars question whether there in fact was a "parting of the ways" between Judaism and Christianity. Includes a new preface by the editors discussing scholarship since 2003.

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How Did Christianity Begin?: A Believer and Non-Believer Examine the Evidence Michael F. Bird, James G. Crossley  
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• Provides an introduction to Christian origins from two very different points of view
• There is increasing interest in Christian origins at the scholarly and also popular level
• Includes contributions from internationally known scholars Scot McKnight and Maurice Casey

The objective of How Did Christianity Begin? is to present two contrasting perspectives on the history of early Christianity. The contrast is evidently sharp as one co-author comes from a conservative Christian background (Michael Bird), while the other co-author (James Crossley) approaches the matter from a secular standpoint. The volume works sequentially through Christian origins and addresses various topics including the historical Jesus, the resurrection of Jesus, the Apostle Paul, the Gospels, and the early church. Each author in turn examines these subjects and lays out his historical arguments concerning their origin and meaning.

The volume also includes short responses from two other scholars (Maurice Casey and Scot McKnight) to the arguments of Bird and Crossley so as to give an even handed and broad evaluation of the arguments and debates that unfold.

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The Borough Park Papers Symposium II: The Deity of Messiah and the Mystery of God Darrell L. Bock, Ph.D., Akiva Cohen, Mitch Glaser, Th.D., Richard Harvey, Mark S. Kinzer, Jhan Moskowitz, Elliot Klayman, Daniel Nessim, David Rosenberg, David Rudolph, Joseph Shulam  
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As you read the New Testament, you "overhear" debates first-century Messianic Jews had about critical issues, e.g. Gentiles being "allowed" into the Messianic kingdom (Acts 15). Similarly, you`re now invited to "listen in" as leading twenty-first century Messianic Jewish theologians discuss critical issues facing us today. Some ideas may not fit into your previously held pre-suppositions or pre-conceptions. Indeed, you may find some paradigm shifting in your thinking. We want to share the thoughts of these thinkers with you, our family in the Messiah.

1936716607
Jewish Law in Gentile Churches: Halakhah and the Beginning of Christian Public Ethics Markus Bockmuehl  
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This text examines the halakhic rationale behind the ethics of Jesus, Paul and the early Christians. It asks questions such as: why did the Gentile church keep Old Testament commandments about sex and idolatry, but disregard many others, like those about food or ritual purity?

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Dying for God: Martyrdom and the Making of Christianity and Judaism Daniel Boyarin  
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Not long ago, everyone knew that Judaism came before Christianity. More recently, scholars have begun to recognize that the historical picture is quite a bit more complicated than that. In the Jewish world of the first century, many sects competed for the name of the true Israel and the true interpreter of the Torah—the Talmud itself speaks of seventy—and the form of Judaism that was to be the seedbed of what eventually became the Christian Church was but one of these many sects. Scholars have come to realize that we can and need to speak of a twin birth of Christianity and Judaism, not a genealogy in which one is parent to the other.

In this book, the author develops a revised understanding of the interactions between nascent Christianity and nascent Judaism in late antiquity, interpreting the two “new” religions as intensely and complexly intertwined throughout this period. Although the “officials” of the eventual winners in both communities—the Rabbis in Judaism and the orthodox leaders in Christianity—sought to deny it, until the end of late antiquity many people remained both Christians and Jews. This resulted, among other things, in much shared religious innovation that affected the respective orthodoxies as well.

Dying for God aims to establish this model as a realistic one through close and comparative readings of contemporary Christian texts and Talmudic narratives that thematize the connections and differences between Christians and Jews as these emerged around the issue of martyrdom. The author argues that, in the end, the developing discourse of martyrology involved the circulation and exchange of cultural and religious innovations between the two communities as they moved toward sharper self-definition.

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Border Lines: The Partition of Judaeo-Christianity Daniel Boyarin  
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The historical separation between Judaism and Christianity is often figured as a clearly defined break of a single entity into two separate religions. Following this model, there would have been one religion known as Judaism before the birth of Christ, which then took on a hybrid identity. Even before its subsequent division, certain beliefs and practices of this composite would have been identifiable as Christian or Jewish.In Border Lines, however, Daniel Boyarin makes a striking case for a very different way of thinking about the historical development that is the partition of Judaeo-Christianity.

There were no characteristics or features that could be described as uniquely Jewish or Christian in late antiquity, Boyarin argues. Rather, Jesus-following Jews and Jews who did not follow Jesus lived on a cultural map in which beliefs, such as that in a second divine being, and practices, such as keeping kosher or maintaining the Sabbath, were widely and variably distributed. The ultimate distinctions between Judaism and Christianity were imposed from above by "border-makers," heresiologists anxious to construct a discrete identity for Christianity. By defining some beliefs and practices as Christian and others as Jewish or heretical, they moved ideas, behaviors, and people to one side or another of an artificial border—and, Boyarin significantly contends, invented the very notion of religion.

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Jews and Christians: People of God Mr. Carl E. Braaten  
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While Christians and Jews have always been aware of their religious connections - historical community, overlapping theology, shared scriptures - that awareness has traditionally been infected by centuries of mutual suspicion and hostility. As this important volume shows, however, theologians and scholars of Judaism and Christianity alike are now radically rethinking the relation between their two covenant communities. Jews and Christians presents the best of this work, introducing readers to a coherent Jewish theology of Christianity and a Christian theology of Judaism. Here are leading Christian and Jewish thinkers who have engaged in extensive conversation, who take each other's work seriously, and who avoid the pitfall common to Jewish-Christian dialogue - watering down distinctive beliefs to accommodate both partners. Indeed, these pages show how the new theological exchange goes to the roots of that "olive tree" of which both Judaism and Christianity are branches, and the book as a whole represents post-Holocaust Jewish-Christian dialogue at the highest theological level.

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A Theology of the Jewish-Christian Reality Paul Van Buren  
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This is the first, and most referred to, Christian systemic theology to make clear for the Church the relevance of the continuing existence of the Jewish people to every aspect of its theology. The three volumes set out to correct a major and central deficiency in the field: that the continuing existence of Israel, the people of God and the people of Jesus, whose ancestors produced by far the largest part of the Church's Bible, and who have lived by the covenant of those Scriptures through the ages, has been either ignored or treated negatively. "A Theology of the Jewish-Christian Reality" continues to stimulate fresh thinking about the foundations for responsible theological reflection. This second volume makes an original contribution to the Church's theology by drawing on the insights and discoveries of Jewish thought and life. Van Buren argues that God's election of the Jewish people as his witnesses remains in force and calls the Church to listen to that witness. àIOriginally published in 1983 by Harper and Row Publishers.

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