Preaching the Letters Without Dismissing the Law: A Lectionary Commentary Ronald J. Allen, Clark M. Williamson  
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This unique lectionary commentary on the Epistle readings in the Revised Common Lectionary helps preachers see how knowledge of first-century Judaism can help them avoid incorporating misunderstandings and stereotypes into their sermons on the letters. Allen and Williamson highlight insights from recent Christian-Jewish dialogue, call attention to the continuities between Judaism and the theology of Paul, and explore how awareness of the Roman occupation can help the preacher understand the Jewish context of the letters. As in Preaching the Gospels without Blaming the Jews, they also suggest how today’s preacher can deal with issues or comments in the text that are inappropriate or controversial in today’s context.

0664230016
Epistle to the Philippians, The Markus Bockmuehl  
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Since its appearance nearly thirty-five years ago, Black's New Testament Commentary Series has been hailed by both scholars and pastors for its insightful interpretations and reliable commentary. Each book in the series includes: an insightful introduction to the important historical, literary, and theological issues; key terms and phrases from the translation highlighted in the commentary where they are discussed; explanations of special Greek or foreign terms; references to important primary and secondary literature; and a Scripture index.

Designed to make the latest scholarship on Philippians accessible to a broader readership, this new commentary brings to life both the letter's historical setting and its vigorously theological purpose. A number of important recent studies of the social and religious context of first-century Philippi are here considered for the first time in a commentary, and the author offers a critical engagement with several of the newer approaches to Pauline interpretation, including questions of rhetoric and social convention. Theological highlights include the themes of Christian joy in all circumstances, the Philippians' active 'stake-holding' partnership in the gospel, and above all the pervasive passion for a union with Christ in following his self-humbling example of service. Giving due attention both to the theological heritage of St. Paul's Jewish background and to the Greco-Roman social and religious setting of his readership, this commentary relates a well-grounded understanding of the letter's first-century impact to the wider concerns of Christian theology.

0801045673
Paul's Prison Letters: Philemon Philippians and Colossians Daniel Harrington  
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This volume presents spiritual commentaries on three of Saint Paul's Letters. For each letter there is an introduction the text according to the New American Bible with an exposition for each passage and reflections on the letter's significance for Christian life today. the commentaries seek to open up for nonspecialists the spiritual riches contained in these texts and to help the reader understand the scriptures and integrate them in meditation prayer and action.

1565480880
A Jew to the Jews: Jewish Contours of Pauline Flexibility in 1 Corinthians 9:19-23 David J. Rudolph  
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David Rudolph's primary aim is to demonstrate that scholars overstate their case when they maintain that 1 Cor 9:19-23 is incompatible with a Torah-observant Paul. A secondary aim is to show how one might understand 1 Cor 9:19-23 as the discourse of a Jew who remained within the bounds of pluriform Second Temple Judaism. Part I addresses the intertextual, contextual and textual case for the traditional reading of 1 Cor 9:19-23. Weaknesses are pointed out and alternative approaches are considered. The exegetical case in Part II centres on interpreting 1 Cor 9:19-23 in light of Paul's recapitulation in 1 Cor 10:32-11:1, which concludes with the statement, "Be imitators of me, as I am of Christ".

Given the food-related and hospitality context of 1 Cor 8-10, and Paul's reference to dominical sayings that point back to Jesus' example and rule of adaptation, it is argued that 1 Cor 9:19-23 reflects Paul's imitation of Jesus' accommodation-oriented table-fellowship with all. As Jesus became all things to all people through eating with ordinary Jews, Pharisees and sinners, Paul became "all things to all people" through eating with ordinary Jews, strict Jews (those "under the law") and Gentile sinners. This Cambridge University dissertation won the 2007 Franz Delitzsch Prize from the Freie Theologische Akademie.

3161492935
Introduction to Messianic Judaism: Its Ecclesial Context and Biblical Foundations David J. Rudolph, Joel Willitts  
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This book is the go-to source for introductory information on Messianic Judaism. Editors David Rudolph and Joel Willitts have assembled a thorough examination of the ecclesial context and biblical foundations of the diverse Messianic Jewish movement. The work brings together a team of respected Messianic Jewish and Gentile Christian scholars, including Mark Kinzer, Richard Bauckham, Markus Bockmuehl, Craig Keener, Darrell Bock, Scott Hafemann, Daniel Harrington, R. Kendall Soulen, Douglas Harink and others. Opening essays, written by Messianic Jewish scholars and synagogue leaders, provide a window into the on-the-ground reality of the Messianic Jewish community and reveal the challenges, questions and issues with which Messianic Jews grapple. The following predominantly Gentile Christian discussion explores a number of biblical and theological issues that inform our understanding of the Messianic Jewish ecclesial context. Here is a balanced and accessible introduction to the diverse Messianic Jewish movement that all readers will find informative and fascinating.

0310330637
Jewish New Testament Commentary: A Companion Volume to the Jewish New Testament David H. Stern  
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- The Torah (Law of Moses)—is it in full force today? Yeshua (Jesus) said, "Don't think that I have come to abolish the Torah... I have come not to abolish, but to complete." What did he mean?

- Sha'ul (Paul) wrote, "All Israel will be saved." Was he speaking of all Jews? Messianic Jews (Jews who believe Yeshua is the Messiah)? The Church? Who is Israel?

- Why did Yeshua juxtapose the saying, "Do not store up for yourselves wealth here on earth" and "The eye is the light of the body"?

Dr. David Stern, a Messianic Jew living in Jerusalem, speaks to these and other issues in the Jewish New Testament Commentary. In this companion volume to his widely read and highly acclaimed "Jewish New Testament," he offers an exciting and original way of understanding the New Testament from a Jewish point of view.

9653590111