Preaching the Gospels without Blaming the Jews: A Lectionary Commentary Ronald J. Allen  
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The four gospels are steeped in Judaism: one cannot understand any one of them without knowledge of Jewish people, practices, scriptures, and institutions in the first century. At the same time, the gospels reflect tension and even animosity between the communities of the gospel writers and other Jewish groups, and often caricature some Jewish people, practices, and institutions to justify a separation between traditional Jewish groups and the communities of Mark, Matthew, Luke, and John.

In this timely commentary on the Gospel readings in the Revised Common Lectionary, Allen and Williamson call attention to ways in which the lections are continuous with the theology, values, and practices of Judaism, and reflect critically on the caricatures in the readings. They explain the polemics in their first-century setting but criticize them historically and theologically. They also suggest ways that preachers can help their congregations move beyond these contentious themes to a greater sense of kinship and shared mission with Judaism.

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How Did Christianity Begin?: A Believer and Non-Believer Examine the Evidence Michael F. Bird, James G. Crossley  
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• Provides an introduction to Christian origins from two very different points of view
• There is increasing interest in Christian origins at the scholarly and also popular level
• Includes contributions from internationally known scholars Scot McKnight and Maurice Casey

The objective of How Did Christianity Begin? is to present two contrasting perspectives on the history of early Christianity. The contrast is evidently sharp as one co-author comes from a conservative Christian background (Michael Bird), while the other co-author (James Crossley) approaches the matter from a secular standpoint. The volume works sequentially through Christian origins and addresses various topics including the historical Jesus, the resurrection of Jesus, the Apostle Paul, the Gospels, and the early church. Each author in turn examines these subjects and lays out his historical arguments concerning their origin and meaning.

The volume also includes short responses from two other scholars (Maurice Casey and Scot McKnight) to the arguments of Bird and Crossley so as to give an even handed and broad evaluation of the arguments and debates that unfold.

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Luke 1:1-9:50 Darrell L. Bock  
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Pastors, academics, and laypersons serious about understanding Scripture will delight in this understandable, yet thorough, exegesis that provides excellent insights into the third Gospel.

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Luke Darrell L. Bock  
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Most Bible commentaries take us on a one-way trip from the twentieth century to the first century. But they leave us there, assuming that we can somehow make the return journey on our own. In other words, they focus on the original meaning of the passage but don't discuss its contemporary application. The information they offer is valuable — but the job is only half done! The NIV Application Commentary Series helps us with both halves of the interpretive task. This new and unique series shows readers how to bring an ancient message into modern context. It explains not only what the Bible means but also how it can speak powerfully today.

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Luke 9:51-24:53 Darrell L. Bock  
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This clearly-organized, contemporary analysis gives scholars, ministers, and teachers valuable perspective on Luke—from Jesus' journey to Jerusalem, through the Last Supper, to the resurrection.

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Luke Darrell L. Bock  
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This informative, balanced commentary includes extensive introductory notes and a comprehensive discussion of the text. An outstanding addition to any academic, pastoral, or student library.

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Luke Darrell L. Bock  
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In Luke's vivid narrative, Jesus comes into Galilee proclaiming "good news to the poor . . . freedom for the prisoners and recovery of sight for the blind." More than any other Gospel, the Gospel of Luke shows Jesus' great concern for the downtrodden, the oppressed and the marginalized—including women and children and even those outside the house of Israel. Darrell Bock shows why Luke's Gospel is "tailor-made" for the world we live in—a world often divided along ethnic, religious, economic and political lines. After all, the Jesus portrayed by Luke is a source of unity for his disciples and for believers from every walk of life. Tax collectors, Roman soldiers, prostitutes, city officials, religious leaders, widows and fishermen were among the diverse group brought together in the early Christian church. Bock's dual focus on understanding what Luke wanted to communicate to his original readers and on how that message is relevant for today makes this an excellent resource.

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A Theology of Luke and Acts: God's Promised Program, Realized for All Nations Darrell L. Bock, Andreas J. Kostenberger  
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Zondervan's Biblical Theology of the New Testament Series has for years provided pastors, students, and readers with valuable analyses of New Testament books and their contents. In this latest installment, Darrell L. Bock examines Luke and Acts, drawing from his years of experience in biblical theory and interpretation to write an informative resource sure to prove invaluable for seekers of holistic biblical understanding. A Theology of Luke andamp; Actsidentifies and evaluates the contribution of Luke, both to the New Testament and to the Bible as a whole text. Bock aims to demonstrate Luke's significance and his influence in the development of theological discourse. Features include: * Lukan themes and thematic relevance * Interpretation and significance of language and vocabulary * Contextual importance of Luke's placement in the Bible Continuing the valuable tradition of the Biblical Theology of the New Testament Series, Bock's theories regarding Luke and Acts will prove a lasting resource for pastors and aspiring biblical scholars alike.

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Why Christianity Happened: A Sociohistorical Account of Christian Origins James Crossley  
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“This is an important work. It makes the major advance of comparing the approaches of biblical scholars to the history of Christian origins with the approaches of historians in other periods and aspects of history. . . . Crossley’s whole discussion constitutes in its own right a significant advance in knowledge. He is crucially effective in sorting out useful insights in the secondary literature from the ideological concerns that generally dominate conventional scholarship.” —Maurice Casey, Professor of New Testament Languages and Literature, University of Nottingham, UK “The reasons why Christianity included people who were no longer observing major commandments were largely social rather than the result of an individual genius like a Jesus or a Paul finding ‘something wrong’ with Jewish law. But these social reasons for the shift from a law-observant movement to one that included people no longer observing the law require a full explanation. This book is an attempt to do just that.” —from the introduction Looking beyond theological narratives and offering a sociological, economic, and historical examination of the spread of earliest Christianity, James Crossley presents a thoroughly secular and causal explanation for why the once law-observant movement within Judaism became the beginnings of a new religion. First analyzing the historiography of the New Testament and stressing the problematic omission of a social scientific account, Crossley applies a socioeconomic lens to the rise of the Jesus movement and the centrality of sinners to his mission. Using macrosociological approaches, he explains how Jesus’ Jewish teachings sparked the shift toward a gentile religion and an international monotheistic trend. Finally, using approaches from conversion studies, he provides a sociohistorical explanation for the rise of the Pauline mission.

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New Testament and Jewish Law: A Guide for the Perplexed James G. Crossley  
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Ludwig Wittgenstein's Philosophical Investigations is a hugely important piece of philosophical writing, one frequently encountered by students of philosophy. Yet, there is no escaping the extent of the challenge posed by Wittgenstein's work, in which complex ideas are often enigmatically expressed. In Wittgenstein's 'Philosophical Investigations' A Reader's Guide, Arif Ahmed offers a clear and thorough account of this key philosophical work. Geared towards the specific requirements of students who need to reach a sound understanding of the text as a whole, the book offers guidance on: - Philosophical and historical context - Key themes - Reading the text - Reception and influence - Further reading

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Jews and Anti-Judaism in the New Testament: Decision Points and Divergent Interpretations Terence L. Donaldson  
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Jews and Anti-Judaism in the New Testament offers a balanced, sensitive, and erudite guide to the precarious issues of anti-Semitism, anti-Judaism, and supersessionism in the New Testament. Combining adept navigation of the relevant literature—both classics of the field and more recent forays—with a keen exegetical analysis of the Christian canon, Terence L. Donaldson maps the major New Testament writings across three axes: self-definition, degree of separation, and rhetorical intent. In doing so, he successfully brings his readers up to speed on this crucial discussion, even while pushing the conversation forward with intellectual force and exegetical savvy.

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The Hebrew Gospel and the Development of the Synoptic Tradition James R. Edwards  
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This book offers a new explanation of the development of the first three Gospels based on a careful examination of both patristic testimony to the “Hebrew Gospel” and internal evidence in the canonical Gospels themselves. James Edwards breaks new ground and challenges assumptions that have long been held in the New Testament guild but actually lack solid evidence.

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Anti-Judaism and the Gospels William R. Farmer  
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When and under what circumstances did the Gospel texts begin to serve anti-Jewish ends? Can it be said, accurately and fairly, that the evangelists were anti-Jewish? Are there tendencies in the Gospels that were originally intended by the evangelists to injure the Jewish people or their religion, or to work against the interests of the Jewish people and/or their religion? These and other issues were addressed in a three-year research project that culminated in a fall 1996 convocation, at which five major research papers were presented with two respondents to each paper. The papers and responses are now made available for the first time in this volume. William R. Farmer is Professor of New Testament at the University of Dallas and co-editor of Jesus and the Suffering Servant: Isaiah 53 and Christian Origins (Trinity 1998).

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The Restoration of Israel: Israel's Re-gathering and the Fate of the Nations in Early Jewish Literature and Luke-Acts Michael E. Fuller  
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This study identifies and explores texts of restoration in a wide selection of Early Jewish Literature in order to assess the variety of ways in which Jews envisioned Israel's future restoration. Particular attention is given to the expression of restoration in what is identified in the present study as the exilic model of restoration. In this model, Israel's restoration is characterized by the features of (a) a future re-gathering, (b) the fate of the nations, and (c) the establishment of a new Temple. The present work focuses primarily on the first two features. Through this framework Jews in the Greco-Roman period could draw on Israel's history and legacy, but re-appropriate `exile and return' in new and creative ways. Finally, the writing of Luke-Acts is investigated for its ideas of restoration and its indebtedness to Early Jewish traditions.

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