Preaching the Letters Without Dismissing the Law: A Lectionary Commentary Ronald J. Allen, Clark M. Williamson  
More Details

This unique lectionary commentary on the Epistle readings in the Revised Common Lectionary helps preachers see how knowledge of first-century Judaism can help them avoid incorporating misunderstandings and stereotypes into their sermons on the letters. Allen and Williamson highlight insights from recent Christian-Jewish dialogue, call attention to the continuities between Judaism and the theology of Paul, and explore how awareness of the Roman occupation can help the preacher understand the Jewish context of the letters. As in Preaching the Gospels without Blaming the Jews, they also suggest how today’s preacher can deal with issues or comments in the text that are inappropriate or controversial in today’s context.

0664230016
The Broken Wall: A Study of the Epistle to the Ephesians Marcus Barth  
More Details

In this signficant book an eminent theologian challenges the reader to give heed to a most important portion of the Scriptures, Paul?

1573832294
The Anchor Bible - Ephesians 4-6 [A New Translation with Introduction and Commentary By Markus Barth] Marcus Barth  
More Details

Ephesians has been called the crown of St. Paul's writing, yet both its authorship and addressee are the subject of continuing dispute. Through line-by-line examination of its vocabulary, its difficult style, its Qumran and Gnostic affinities, its parallels with and distinctions from the undisputed Pauline corpus, its use of the Old Testament, and its dialogue with orthodox and heretical Judaism, Markus Barth demonstrates that Paul was almost certainly the author. And, after exploring previous explications of this hymnic and admonitory epistle in detail, he concludes that it was intended for Gentile Christians converted after Paul's visits to Ephesus. In this volume Barth has followed the structure of Ephesians: Chapters 4-6, are based on the admonitions. Through his special understanding and love of the apostle Paul, Markus Barth reopens to modern man the ancient message of love, worship and joy.

B000QXV9BU
Ephesians: Introduction, Translation, and Commentary on Chapters 1-3 Markus Barth  
More Details

Encompassing the body of Pauline theology, Ephesians (volumes 34 and 34A of the acclaimed Anchor Bible series) has been called "the crown of St. Paul's writings," yet both its authorship and addressees are the subject of continuing dispute.  Through line-by-line examination of its vocabulary, its difficult style, its Qumran and Gnostic affinities, its parallels with and distinctions from the undisputed Pauline corpus, its use of the Old Testament, and its dialogue with orthodox and heretical Judaism, Markus Barth demonstrates that Paul was almost certainly the author.  And, after exploring previous explications of this hymnic and admonitory epistle in detail, he concludes that it was intended for Gentile Christians converted after Paul's visits to Ephesus.

On this basis, Barth reexamines the relationship between Israel and the church, discounting the thesis that Ephesians suggests an "early Catholic," or high-ecclesiastic or sacramental doctrine.  Instead, he finds in this letter a statement of the social reconciliation which conditions the salvation of the individual.  And reevaluating the section describing the relation between husband and wife, he offers an alternative to the traditional notion that Paul degrades women or belittles their rights and their dignity.

In these two volumes Barth has followed the structure of Ephesians: upon the praise of God (chapters 1-3) are based the admonitions (chapters 4-6). But just as the epistle is an integral whole, so is the author's commentary.  Through his special understanding and love of the apostle Paul, Markus Barth reopens to modern man the ancient message of love, worship and joy.

0385044127
Ephesians: A Commentary Stephen E. Fowl  
More Details

Even though it was written some two millennia ago, Ephesians still speaks to Christians today in themes quite familiar to the modern reader. In a context where the church had become overwhelmingly, if not exclusively, Gentile, the Christian community needed to be reminded of the priority of Israel and the astonishing work of reconciliation that God willed to accomplish in the life, death, and resurrection of Jesus Christ. This new volume in the highly acclaimed New Testament Library series reveals the great theological promises of Ephesians while discussing issues of context, authorship, and style.

0664221254
'All of You are One': The Social Vision of Gal 3.28, 1 Cor 12.13 and Col 3.11 Bruce Hansen  
More Details

Hansen argues against prevalent views that the unity formula employed in Gal 3.28, 1 Cor 12.13 and Col 3.11 reflects either a Hellenistic anthropology of ideal androgyny or a modern liberal conception of social equality.

Rather, Hansen contends, attention to function and context demonstrates each epistle's vision of social unity. Insights from ethnic theory elucidate how epistles characterize this unity in terms of a new social identity, and the practices warranted by that identity. Furthermore, Hansen claims that because identity construction is continual, dynamic and discursive, alternate identities (e.g. ethnic, gender, religious, economic) within the new Christian communities, may be seen as influencing one another and may be termed as the collective Christian identity.

Hansen employs theories from Ethnic study as tools for assessing how such overlapping identities persist and interact with one another. His analysis thereby demonstrates that the social unity promoted by this formula opposes cultural dominance by any particular group and, conversely reinforces the persistence of marginal social identities within new communities. The issue is then not one of gender equality, but of the equality that Paul wishes to develop between competing social groups.

0567136043
Ephesians Thomas R. Yoder Neufeld  
More Details

Ephesians presents readers with a volatile mix of assurance, exhilarating worship, and forceful exhortation-a bracing challenge to today's church. The letter convinces Thomas R. Yoder Neufeld that the grace-gift of faithfulness leads to worship. Power, peace, and new creation are gifts of grace equipping the church to participate in God's reconciling embrace. This commentary guides readers to a life-changing encounter with Ephesians, probing interpretations, refreshing Christian teaching, and calling everyone to "walk" accordingly, with a song in heart and throat. 402 Pages.

0836191676
A Jew to the Jews: Jewish Contours of Pauline Flexibility in 1 Corinthians 9:19-23 David J. Rudolph  
More Details

David Rudolph's primary aim is to demonstrate that scholars overstate their case when they maintain that 1 Cor 9:19-23 is incompatible with a Torah-observant Paul. A secondary aim is to show how one might understand 1 Cor 9:19-23 as the discourse of a Jew who remained within the bounds of pluriform Second Temple Judaism. Part I addresses the intertextual, contextual and textual case for the traditional reading of 1 Cor 9:19-23. Weaknesses are pointed out and alternative approaches are considered. The exegetical case in Part II centres on interpreting 1 Cor 9:19-23 in light of Paul's recapitulation in 1 Cor 10:32-11:1, which concludes with the statement, "Be imitators of me, as I am of Christ".

Given the food-related and hospitality context of 1 Cor 8-10, and Paul's reference to dominical sayings that point back to Jesus' example and rule of adaptation, it is argued that 1 Cor 9:19-23 reflects Paul's imitation of Jesus' accommodation-oriented table-fellowship with all. As Jesus became all things to all people through eating with ordinary Jews, Pharisees and sinners, Paul became "all things to all people" through eating with ordinary Jews, strict Jews (those "under the law") and Gentile sinners. This Cambridge University dissertation won the 2007 Franz Delitzsch Prize from the Freie Theologische Akademie.

3161492935
Introduction to Messianic Judaism: Its Ecclesial Context and Biblical Foundations David J. Rudolph, Joel Willitts  
More Details

This book is the go-to source for introductory information on Messianic Judaism. Editors David Rudolph and Joel Willitts have assembled a thorough examination of the ecclesial context and biblical foundations of the diverse Messianic Jewish movement. The work brings together a team of respected Messianic Jewish and Gentile Christian scholars, including Mark Kinzer, Richard Bauckham, Markus Bockmuehl, Craig Keener, Darrell Bock, Scott Hafemann, Daniel Harrington, R. Kendall Soulen, Douglas Harink and others. Opening essays, written by Messianic Jewish scholars and synagogue leaders, provide a window into the on-the-ground reality of the Messianic Jewish community and reveal the challenges, questions and issues with which Messianic Jews grapple. The following predominantly Gentile Christian discussion explores a number of biblical and theological issues that inform our understanding of the Messianic Jewish ecclesial context. Here is a balanced and accessible introduction to the diverse Messianic Jewish movement that all readers will find informative and fascinating.

0310330637
Jewish New Testament Commentary: A Companion Volume to the Jewish New Testament David H. Stern  
More Details

- The Torah (Law of Moses)—is it in full force today? Yeshua (Jesus) said, "Don't think that I have come to abolish the Torah... I have come not to abolish, but to complete." What did he mean?

- Sha'ul (Paul) wrote, "All Israel will be saved." Was he speaking of all Jews? Messianic Jews (Jews who believe Yeshua is the Messiah)? The Church? Who is Israel?

- Why did Yeshua juxtapose the saying, "Do not store up for yourselves wealth here on earth" and "The eye is the light of the body"?

Dr. David Stern, a Messianic Jew living in Jerusalem, speaks to these and other issues in the Jewish New Testament Commentary. In this companion volume to his widely read and highly acclaimed "Jewish New Testament," he offers an exciting and original way of understanding the New Testament from a Jewish point of view.

9653590111
Reading Scripture as a Political Act: Essays on the Theopolitical Interpretation of the Bible Matthew A. Tapie, Daniel Wade McClain  
More Details

Although scholars increasingly understand Scripture to contain political dimensions and implications, the interpretation of Scripture is often marginalized in most scholarly discussions of political theology. Reading Scripture as a Political Act takes a step toward remedying this situation by exploring some of the ways the church has read Scripture politically. In particular, this volume examines the political character of premodern and modern theologians' readings of Scripture with attention to how their readings relate to or address political challenges in their particular social and historical settings. The essays attempt to illuminate the ways that the theological interpretation of Scripture shaped the theopolitical imaginations of Augustine, Basil of Caesarea, Bonaventure, Thomas Aquinas, Bartolome de las Casas, John Wesley, Karl Barth, Henri de Lubac, and John Howard Yoder, among others. Several essays in the volume also take constructive steps and suggest how these models of reading Scripture can inform the contemporary task of reading Scripture in political contexts. The volume covers the earliest Christian centuries to the late modern era, and considers carefully the close coordination between Scripture, theology, and social and political concerns. As a whole, the collection provides a robust survey of Christian theopolitical interpretation of the Bible.

1451479638