Preaching the Letters Without Dismissing the Law: A Lectionary Commentary Ronald J. Allen, Clark M. Williamson  
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This unique lectionary commentary on the Epistle readings in the Revised Common Lectionary helps preachers see how knowledge of first-century Judaism can help them avoid incorporating misunderstandings and stereotypes into their sermons on the letters. Allen and Williamson highlight insights from recent Christian-Jewish dialogue, call attention to the continuities between Judaism and the theology of Paul, and explore how awareness of the Roman occupation can help the preacher understand the Jewish context of the letters. As in Preaching the Gospels without Blaming the Jews, they also suggest how today’s preacher can deal with issues or comments in the text that are inappropriate or controversial in today’s context.

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Idol Food in Corinth: Jewish Background and Pauline Legacy Alex T. Cheung  
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This historical and exegetical strongly challenges the widely held view that Paul regarded idol food as a matter of indifference. Instead, it proposes that Paul considers conscious consumption of idol food a denial of one's allegiance to Christ.

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Paul at the Crossroads of Cultures: Theologizing in the Space Between Kathy Ehrensperger  
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Based on recent studies in intercultural communication Kathy Ehrensperger applies the paradigm of multilingualism, which includes the recognition of cultural distinctiveness, to the study of Paul. Paul’s role as apostle to the nations is seen as the role of a go-between – as that of cultural translator. This role requires that he is fully embedded in his own tradition but must also be able to appreciate and understand aspects of gentile culture. Paul is viewed as involved in a process in which the meaning of the Christ event is being negotiated ‘in the space between’ cultures, with their diverse cultural coding systems and cultural encyclopaedias. It is argued that this is not a process of imposing Jewish culture on gentiles at the expense of gentile identity, nor is it a process of eradication of Jewish identity. Rather, Paul’s theologizing in the space between implies the task of negotiating the meaning of the Christ event in relation to, and in appreciation of both, Jewish and gentile identity.

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Decisive Meals: Table Politics in Biblical Literature Kathy Ehrensperger, Luzia Sutter Rehmann, Nathan MacDonald  
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Decisive Meals discusses various aspects of meal traditions and their relevance in terms of boundaries between different groups in the context of first century Judaism and the early Christ-movement. The contributors discuss different communities at different times and places - under the same focus of common meals: The postexilic community in Judaea, the Pauline communities in Asia Minor, as well as in the Roman dominated city of Caesarea and the Hellenistic Jewish community and the emerging rabbinical community - each time a community is affected through the sharing of meals, but how exactly? What are similar effects - where are the differences? This sheds light on power dynamics between rich and poor, well fed and hungry, but also between men and women. These questions will clarify how detailed exegesis is influenced by hermeneutical patterns and ideas about food, boundaries and power dynamics.

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Decisive Meals: Table Politics in Biblical Literature Kathy Ehrensperger, Luzia Sutter Rehmann, Nathan MacDonald  
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Decisive Meals discusses various aspects of meal traditions and their relevance in terms of boundaries between different groups in the context of first century Judaism and the early Christ-movement. The contributors discuss different communities at different times and places - under the same focus of common meals: The postexilic community in Judaea, the Pauline communities in Asia Minor, as well as in the Roman dominated city of Caesarea and the Hellenistic Jewish community and the emerging rabbinical community - each time a community is affected through the sharing of meals, but how exactly? What are similar effects - where are the differences? This sheds light on power dynamics between rich and poor, well fed and hungry, but also between men and women. These questions will clarify how detailed exegesis is influenced by hermeneutical patterns and ideas about food, boundaries and power dynamics.

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'All of You are One': The Social Vision of Gal 3.28, 1 Cor 12.13 and Col 3.11 Bruce Hansen  
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Hansen argues against prevalent views that the unity formula employed in Gal 3.28, 1 Cor 12.13 and Col 3.11 reflects either a Hellenistic anthropology of ideal androgyny or a modern liberal conception of social equality.

Rather, Hansen contends, attention to function and context demonstrates each epistle's vision of social unity. Insights from ethnic theory elucidate how epistles characterize this unity in terms of a new social identity, and the practices warranted by that identity. Furthermore, Hansen claims that because identity construction is continual, dynamic and discursive, alternate identities (e.g. ethnic, gender, religious, economic) within the new Christian communities, may be seen as influencing one another and may be termed as the collective Christian identity.

Hansen employs theories from Ethnic study as tools for assessing how such overlapping identities persist and interact with one another. His analysis thereby demonstrates that the social unity promoted by this formula opposes cultural dominance by any particular group and, conversely reinforces the persistence of marginal social identities within new communities. The issue is then not one of gender equality, but of the equality that Paul wishes to develop between competing social groups.

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Paul and Judaism: Crosscurrents in Pauline Exegesis and the Study of Jewish-Christian Relations Didier Pollefeyt, Reimund Bieringer  
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The ‘New Perspective on Paul' cleared Judaism contemporary to Paul of the accusation that it was a religion based on works of righteousness. Reactions to the New Perspective, both positive and critical, and sometimes even strongly negative, reflect a more fundamental problem in the reception of this paradigm: the question of continuity and discontinuity between Judaism and Christianity and its assumed implications for Jewish-Christian dialogue. A second key problem revolves around Paul's understanding of salvation as exclusive, inclusive or pluralist. The contributions in the present volume represent at least six approaches that can be plotted along this axis, considering Paul's theology in its Jewish context. William S. Campbell and Thomas R. Blanton consider Paul's Covenantal Theology, Michael Bachman provides an exegetical study of Paul, Israel and the Gentiles, and Mark D. Nanos considers Paul and Torah. After this chapters by Philip A. Cunningham, John T. Pawlikowski, Hans-Joachim Sander, and Hans-Herman Henrix give particular weight to questions of Jewish-Christian dialogue. The book finishes with an epilogue by pioneer of the New Perspective James D.G. Dunn.

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A Jew to the Jews: Jewish Contours of Pauline Flexibility in 1 Corinthians 9:19-23 David J. Rudolph  
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David Rudolph's primary aim is to demonstrate that scholars overstate their case when they maintain that 1 Cor 9:19-23 is incompatible with a Torah-observant Paul. A secondary aim is to show how one might understand 1 Cor 9:19-23 as the discourse of a Jew who remained within the bounds of pluriform Second Temple Judaism. Part I addresses the intertextual, contextual and textual case for the traditional reading of 1 Cor 9:19-23. Weaknesses are pointed out and alternative approaches are considered. The exegetical case in Part II centres on interpreting 1 Cor 9:19-23 in light of Paul's recapitulation in 1 Cor 10:32-11:1, which concludes with the statement, "Be imitators of me, as I am of Christ".

Given the food-related and hospitality context of 1 Cor 8-10, and Paul's reference to dominical sayings that point back to Jesus' example and rule of adaptation, it is argued that 1 Cor 9:19-23 reflects Paul's imitation of Jesus' accommodation-oriented table-fellowship with all. As Jesus became all things to all people through eating with ordinary Jews, Pharisees and sinners, Paul became "all things to all people" through eating with ordinary Jews, strict Jews (those "under the law") and Gentile sinners. This Cambridge University dissertation won the 2007 Franz Delitzsch Prize from the Freie Theologische Akademie.

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Introduction to Messianic Judaism: Its Ecclesial Context and Biblical Foundations David J. Rudolph, Joel Willitts  
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This book is the go-to source for introductory information on Messianic Judaism. Editors David Rudolph and Joel Willitts have assembled a thorough examination of the ecclesial context and biblical foundations of the diverse Messianic Jewish movement. The work brings together a team of respected Messianic Jewish and Gentile Christian scholars, including Mark Kinzer, Richard Bauckham, Markus Bockmuehl, Craig Keener, Darrell Bock, Scott Hafemann, Daniel Harrington, R. Kendall Soulen, Douglas Harink and others. Opening essays, written by Messianic Jewish scholars and synagogue leaders, provide a window into the on-the-ground reality of the Messianic Jewish community and reveal the challenges, questions and issues with which Messianic Jews grapple. The following predominantly Gentile Christian discussion explores a number of biblical and theological issues that inform our understanding of the Messianic Jewish ecclesial context. Here is a balanced and accessible introduction to the diverse Messianic Jewish movement that all readers will find informative and fascinating.

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Por una interpretación no cristiana de Pablo de Tarso Carlos A. Segovia  
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¿Se propuso Pablo de Tarso superar el judaísmo, reformarlo o simplemente integrar a los gentiles en Israel por medio de Cristo? En otras palabras: ¿fue Pablo cristiano conforme al significado que habitualmente asignamos a este término o continuó siendo judío? He ahí una de las cuestiones más intensamente debatidas hoy en los medios académicos internacionales y a la que este libro trata de dar respuesta. Su hipótesis, adelantada en los últimos años por autores como K. Stendahl, Ll. Gaston, J. Gager, N. Elliot, W. Campbell, S. Stowers, M. Nanos, P. Eisenbaum, C. Johnson Hodge, P. Fredriksen y D. Rudolph (partidarios, todos ellos, del que viene llamándose el "nuevo enfoque radical" sobre la figura del Apóstol), es la siguiente: Pablo —a diferencia de lo que enseña la Iglesia— no abandonó el judaísmo, sino que buscó incorporar a los gentiles a Israel en calidad de hijos adoptivos de Abraham instándolos a cooperar con los judíos en la preparación del reino de Dios. Con ello, afirma el autor radicalizando aún más la perspectiva ganada por el nuevo enfoque, Pablo no sólo se opuso a cualquier presunción gentil ante la resistencia de Israel a creer en la llegada del mesías, sino a quienes pensaban que no todo Israel se salvaría —y de antemano, por tanto, a la idea según la cual no hay salvación fuera de la Iglesia. Este innovador libro busca, así pues, liberar a Pablo de su tradicional interpretación cristiana examinando a tal fin las raíces judías del mesianismo paulino y la identidad de sus oponentes. El lector se sorprenderá al comprobar que Pablo no hizo de Jesús un ser divino ni interpretó su muerte en términos sacrificiales, y que quienes se opusieron a su misión fueron, ante todo, ciertos prosélitos o gentiles conversos al judaísmo.

Carlos A. Segovia (Londres, 1970) es miembro de la sociedad académica internacional The Enoch Seminar y profesor asociado de estudios religiosos en la Universidad Camilo José Cela. Es autor, entre otras publicaciones, de The Coming of the Comforter: When, Where, and to Whom? Studies on the Rise of Islam and Other Various Topics in Memory of John Wansbrough (con Basil Lourié, 2012) y traductor al castellano del libro de Daniel Boyarin, Border Lines: The Partition of Judaeo-Christianity (2013).

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Jewish New Testament Commentary: A Companion Volume to the Jewish New Testament David H. Stern  
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- The Torah (Law of Moses)—is it in full force today? Yeshua (Jesus) said, "Don't think that I have come to abolish the Torah... I have come not to abolish, but to complete." What did he mean?

- Sha'ul (Paul) wrote, "All Israel will be saved." Was he speaking of all Jews? Messianic Jews (Jews who believe Yeshua is the Messiah)? The Church? Who is Israel?

- Why did Yeshua juxtapose the saying, "Do not store up for yourselves wealth here on earth" and "The eye is the light of the body"?

Dr. David Stern, a Messianic Jew living in Jerusalem, speaks to these and other issues in the Jewish New Testament Commentary. In this companion volume to his widely read and highly acclaimed "Jewish New Testament," he offers an exciting and original way of understanding the New Testament from a Jewish point of view.

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You Belong to Christ: Paul and the Formation of Social Identity in 1 Corinthians 1-4 J. Brian Tucker  
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You Belong to Christ explores the way that the Apostle Paul sought to form the social identity of one of his most important Christ-following communities. It sheds light on the way various social identities function within the Pauline community and provides guidance concerning the social implications of the gospel. Drawing from contemporary social identity theories as well as ancient source material, J. Brian Tucker describes the way 1 Corinthians 1-4 forms social identity in its readers, so that what results is an alternative community with a distinct ethos, in contrast to the Roman Empire and its imperial ideology. This book contends that previous identities are not obliterated in Christ, but maintain their fundamental significance and serve to further the Pauline mission by means of social integration. Providing a comprehensive survey of Christian identity in Pauline studies as well as an interesting look into the material remains of Roman Corinth, this volume provides a social-scientific reading of 1 Corinthians 1 4, and argues that Paul's strategy was to form salient in Christ social identity in those to whom he wrote.

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